Roommate Fights Lead to Domestic Violence Charges

Roommate Fights Lead to Domestic Violence Charges

One month into the school year, college students are settling into a routine and getting used to new surroundings, new classes, and new friends.  Many returning students, now sophomores and juniors, choose to leave the campus dorm and find housing off campus with roommates.  Sometimes roommates are good friends, sometimes they are acquaintances found to simply help fill the rooms and pay the bills.  In either instance, the roommate relationship is an interesting one, not being family, not being romantic, sometimes not even knowing each other before moving in.  Despite the potential randomness of 2 or more people living in close quarters, they are now in a domestic relationship, legally speaking.

What is an Arizona domestic violence designation

While we always hope for the best when it comes to moving in with friends and acquaintances, the nature of these relationships and forced physical proximity means there are often disagreements that arise.  If an argument occurs between roommates and it reaches the level of loud shouting or other noises, neighbors may contact the police who will respond with a visit to the home. In order to protect victims and keep the peace, police will use their best judgment on who to arrest, but sometimes cite both parties with Arizona domestic violence (or “DV”) regardless or who “started it.”  Officers try to refrain from getting involved with he-said, she-said of any domestic disagreement.

Attorney has achieved reductions and dismissals of domestic violence cases

In my experience I have seen many types of domestic violence charges in a roommate scenario.  Particularly when there is alcohol involved, tempers flare and voices are raised.  If one of the parties throws their roommate’s cell phone, knocks over a lamp, or damages any other property, it could be a criminal damage charge with the Arizona domestic violence designation. Some charges that result in a DV designation may not even involve “violence”: harassment and trespassing are examples.  Our firm has extensive experience with criminal charges with Phoenix domestic violence designation and we understand there are different sides to the story than what the prosecution has.  In some instances, because they don’t need to actually witness the incident, police can simply get it wrong.  My clients arrested for Scottsdale domestic violence or Tempe domestic violence trust us to work hard to get the best outcome for their case, achieving a reduction or even dismissal.